Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘body issues’

Shopping in Singapore can be traumatizing for us non Asian ladies. How many times have we walked into a store to be told some version of “Too big, lah.” Or how many times have we ordered the XL to realize that’s likely the equivalent of an XS in our home country. If you need proof, the online expat forums are full of tearful tales of women made to feel poorly (perhaps inadvertently) about themselves for their size.

Swimsuit shopping can be particularly hard on us ladies on the best of days, much less while doing it in Singapore where sizes run small and most salesclerks are not trained to deal with our Western customs for commenting on body sizes or the general sensitivity needed in addressing us when it comes to our size.

Add pregnancy to this equation and I knew that I was in retail trouble.

My only semi fitting bathing suit was wearing thin and when you live in Singapore, having a working bathing suit at all times is imperative.

I started doing some research and sites like Honeycombers raved about August Society. I know how PR works when it comes to brands and internet promotion, so I approached it with some healthy skepticism.

I stalked August Society like an ex boyfriend for a few weeks. I knew they had a great return policy with free shipping and returns in Singapore, I knew the bottoms and tops were sold separately, and that many designs can be mixed and matched. However, at $89 to $119 SG for individual bottoms and tops and no idea what my body would look like post pregnancy, I still could not take the plunge.

That is until I received a standard $50 off code in honor of SG50. “OK,” I thought, “let’s try it.”

I’m super glad I did. First of all, since I am pregnant, I can later just buy an individual top or bottom as needed when my body does change again. Second of all, the suit is super cute and good quality. Third of all, the customer service was FANTASTIC.

Best of all: I promise you they’ve given me nothing to tell you this and they had no idea that I had a blog to rave about them on.

Toni at August Society was not only super responsive, she went above and beyond when I wanted to trade a size up for the bottoms, making an exception in time schedules to send a courier to my house with my newly sized bottoms before I took off for the long weekend.

So thanks, Toni and August Society for making an 8 month pregnant lady feel nice not only while wearing a bathing suit, but while purchasing it as well.

augustsociety

8 months pregnant!

Read Full Post »

I grew up in small town Texas in the 80s. You can make some basic assumptions about the lifestyle and diet there. It’s now a haven for the world’s most amazing tacos, but before the changing demographics, it was known for fried food and BBQ, and subsequently obesity.

My brothers and I were thin by nature. Tall, lanky types who could eat an entire week’s worth of groceries in one sitting. You didn’t leave food for later, it wouldn’t be there. Even if you hid it in the back of the fridge someone would find your stash. We didn’t try to be this way, we just were. We played like normal kids, alternating between outside and the TV.

And people would comment. We were described thin, bony, tall, slinky.

“Look at that girl. She’s so skinny. Wowee! And blonde too, one day she’ll be a model.”

Skinny, dripping with more envy than smart kind or even wealthy ever held. To be described as skinny held even more status than the bible-belt mandated description of Christian.

Skinny was their issue.

Skinny was my virtue.

Skinny became my identity.

lanky

My brother and I on my first day of eighth grade. Make no mistake, I’m not posing. I’m standing like that because I’m uncomfortable with my height and weight. Also, fringe/bangs are an anxiety ridden bathroom DIY job and shoes are a size to big, purchased on sale at Kmart.

In 1999, I moved away to Austin and attended the University of Texas. As you do, I gained 10 pounds in beer and buffets. It was a mad slap to the face.

I started to workout for the first time in my life. Not because I was interested in being healthy, but because I had lost my value. I may have still been thin and healthy, but I was not skinny. I had fallen from grace.

I’ve spent the last 14 years dealing with some level of body dysmorphia. I am not overweight. I am perfectly suited to my frame. I have amazing long legs and a slightly protruding belly. The belly protrudes partly due to my love of food and partly due to structural hip issues. My pelvis tilts forward due to postural problems and hypermobility. I had hip dysplasia at birth. It’s me. It’s my body.

There have been times when I have tried to cheat the system to find my lost virtue. Crash diets, starvation, diet pills. and then there have been times when I have tried other solutions. Postural realignment, exercise, self acceptance. These days I manage OK.

And then there are the days when hell really is other people. I don’t just mean MTV culture and pressure to be thin. I mean other people’s constant comments on your weight. I went to dinner with a friends family, most of which were obese. The dinner chatter kept circling around to my weight. I wasn’t the one doing it.

“Eat, eat, you’re skinny! You can have more!” I wasn’t starving myself, I was full. “I wish I was that skinny, you skinny Minnie!” It wasn’t my body issues that kept an entire dinner’s conversation circling around my size. It was someone else’s.

Or the look of glee on my mother’s face when she relayed a story of my brother arguing that I was not average sized, I was thin. I didn’t share the joy. I know it was suppose to be a compliment, but I could not be comfortable with the knowledge that my family was conferencing over which category of body size I fit in.*

It is uncomfortable to have one of my most personal things, my body, under scrutiny. Uncomfortable when done by strangers and acquaintances, but more intrusively by friends and family. Your daily intake and expenditures, your most basic life choices are watched and judged. You see, once you’ve been skinny, you will only ever be skinny or formerly skinny.

My body is my body. It is what it is. Most importantly, it works. If I eat healthy and take care of it and avoid any major accidents, it will hopefully continue to work just fine. Strong and healthy. This is the mantra I tell myself daily.

For the last year I have lived in Asia where I am large by comparison. I tower above the girls and boys just like in junior high, except this time I am not skinny. I am surrounded by very slight Asian girls. This is their body type. They are not this way by virtue, just like I was not skinny by virtue at age 10.

I step onto my patio and say hello to my neighbor’s domestic helper. We are both hanging morning laundry to dry. I am dressed for an office meeting.

“Oh you look so fat!” she compliments me.

My dress choice of the day is slightly more Christina Hendricks than Kate Moss.

“Oh it’s the dress,” I laugh. I understand that her intention is to describe me as voluptuous, not fat. Her culture values curves and womanliness. I am slightly working the va-va-voom.

I go inside and change clothes anyway. It’s not my culture to aspire to voluptuousness. But then, I don’t really want to be skinny either.

I just want to be me. Healthy and capable. Preferably free from other people’s issues, expectations and judgments, but most importantly, free to pursue other things in my life than skinny.

*Editor’s note: Blessings to my mother and all her good intentions, she didn’t know she was going to have a writer for a daughter.

Read Full Post »