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Archive for the ‘fried’ Category

Watch out, it’s a bit spicy.

Thai Tofu

Thai Tofu

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I’ve never had things not made for me.

That’s a lie.

The original plans in the engineering building at my university did not call for a women’s bathroom. The school compensated by converting the one on the first floor into a ladies room, much to the chagrin of the men.

And the entire thing about being a female engineer is really a bit abnormal in the first place.

Then there was that period of time- my entire teenage years- when I was too tall and skinny to fit into normal jeans or trousers. Everything was just a few inches too short leaving my socks showing and submitting me to high school mean girls shouting “There’s a flood!” when I turned the corner. Although the bully experience was scarring, you don’t get much sympathy for being too tall and skinny.

And then I gave up eating meat, so there was that. But I lived in Austin, and then London so that wasn’t too much of a problem.

But mostly I fit in. I’m right handed. I’ve never had a disability, unless you count being severely clumsy.

Then I moved to Singapore where my average height self and husband stand up tall over the rest and not eating meat is something the Hindus do, not the ang mohs.

But the daily struggle is the clothes and the beauty products. My friends back home were shocked to hear that in Singapore I was an XL.

Sure you can get the same high street items as you get anywhere like Gap and Zara, but they aren’t guaranteed to stock your size.

For the record, I’m not overweight.

And the beauty products are to lighten skin and smooth the hair, while I already get pretty pasty and have hair so smooth and flat that it will hardly hold in a ponytail.

The sales ladies don’t understand and in their aggressive nature proceed to tell me how their smoothing serum is great for Caucasion hair.

“But lady, look at it. It doesn’t need to be any straighter. It’s already limp and lifeless,” I try to reason with them.

They can’t seem to answer my question as to why the skin product they are pushing is allegedly good for Caucasians. I then realize I am only being placed in one category: white.

This is the portion of the post where I apologize to all my black female friends and acquaintances whom I did not take seriously enough about their hair and beauty product struggles. Obviously my problems are not the same, and yet I still feel traumatized.

I’m made to feel racist when I request a hair stylist who can deal with REALLY fine and thin hair. “All of our stylists our good with Caucasion hair.”  That’s not what I was asking, and by the way I ask this question at all new salons. That includes in the US and Europe. So really, please don’t take offense!

These are first world problems, I know, but you don’t mess with a girl’s hair.

My last haircut left me feeling pretty sad. At the end of the haircut, I had to ask for more product. And more product. “My hair is so fine it’s falling in my eyes,” I had to point out.

“Oh sorry,” she said. “Most Singaporean girls don’t wear product in their hair.” I tried to smile, but couldn’t help but think about how I had just paid her $70 to teach her how to cut my hair.

I know there must be very talented hair stylists in Singapore, I just have to learn where to look.

I walked straight out of the salon- one I found on expat forums miscategorized as cool and chic and good with fine hair mind you- and straight into a plate of cheese fries.

If you are going to engage in emotional eating, might as well do it full force.

I guess I should be grateful that there are some things you can get everywhere.

Texas style, with a side of ranch.

Author’s note: In case you are desperate for a reminder of home, there’s a Chili’s at Tanglin mall and Clarke Quay in Singapore. Normally I wouldn’t condone this behavior, but hey, there’s really no shame in it from time to time. I know a foodie friend who once drove 2 hours in the UK just to go to a TGIFriday’s. Think about how desperate he must’ve been.

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I pass by the Bluebird Cafe on the King’s Road frequently. Often I have stopped to look at the menu, lingered and then walked by. It’s so hard to pass it by with that beautiful courtyard in the budding spring, but I just can’t reconcile it’s price-point on diner food. Erm, I mean, it’s just so Chelsea.

Perhaps it was my recent trip to the Design Museum and my new respect for Terence Conran and his projects, but more likely it was spotting the 2 courses for £10, 3 for £15 sign after a sweaty carb-killing workout that made me finally stop and get a table.

The atmosphere is quite fun with funky chandeliers, hodge-podge chairs and sleek lines. The building itself is an art deco former garage complex built for the Bluebird Motor Company in 1923 that sets the scene perfectly. Despite this, you can’t help but get the feeling that being in a diner to the target clientele here is a novelty.

Funky chandeliers and sleek lines

As a lone diner, I invoked the advice of the server on what to order. She advised that the pumpkin soup was spicy and that the prawn cocktail was popular. She also added that the coley goujons were highly recommended and mumbled when I asked about the spinach gnocchi.

Well, alright then. Lets split the difference. I’ll have the pumpkin soup and the coley goujons. Shit. Did I just order fish and chips? This is not helping me at all towards my goals of a.) losing weight and b.) eating more vegan.

The soup came and the waitress was dead wrong. That pumpkin soup was not spicy. It was actually quite bland save for the pumpkin seeds on top that added an important contrasting texture. The focaccia bread was fresh and soaked up the warm liquid nicely.

Not very spicy pumpkin soup

As for the goujons, they were delicious. I know it’s really hard to go wrong with fried food, but the batter was crisp and light on the tongue if heavy on the stomach. It was a true warm plate of comfort food.

Coley goujons.

There’s something to be said about this style of dining. There is usually some innovation to the dishes and like the decor, the lines of the food are sleek and neat. You are getting something calculated and well presented. But if you want something greasy spoon authentic, this is not it. For a true King’s Road diner with appropriate prices and ennui-ridden waitresses, head to the Stock Pot a few blocks down the road. It’s the kind of place where you can get a decent lunch at 10 am and no one bats an eye. I truly love the Stock Pot for that alone. Plus, a plate of chips there is equally delicious and costs £1.50 compared to the Bluebird’s £4. But if you are treating your girlfriend’s West London mother, new South Kensington business prospect, or random posh friend to a “casual” brunch, this is probably a good bet and chances are you’ll like the food too. Just don’t forget to slyly ask for the 2 for £10 menu, and trust me, you have to ask. Most of the menus conveniently have the insert missing.

The Bluebird Cafe is located at 350 King’s Road near Beaufort Street and is open Mon-Fri 12-2:30, 6-10:30; Saturday 12-3:30, 6-10:30 and Sunday 12-3:30 and 6-9:30.

Bluebird on Urbanspoon

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Courgette Fries from Byron

In case you were wondering, the grilled portobello mushroom burger with roasted red pepper and goat’s cheese was pretty damn good too.

http://www.byronhamburgers.com/

Byron on Urbanspoon

 

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